Having Way Too Much Fun

One of the unexpected delights of working on a podcast has been creating the audio previews. I enjoy making captions anyway – even for my professional video work – and mining each episode for snippets, choosing backdrops, and creating these little sneak peeks is way more fun than it should be.

Our listenership is small at this point, but I’m having a blast with the project, and it’s proven to be a healthy distraction during such a turbulent year, which, in my estimation, deems it worthwhile investment.

That said… [shameless plug incoming]…if you haven’t checked out the podcast but have even a smidgen of interest in Stranger Things, 80s pop culture, nerdy stuff, or intellectual tv/film analysis, wander over and check out Coffee & Contemplation!

Why I Like: Gilmore Girls

GG 2One of the highlights of my young life came in the summer of 2008, when I was working in Marina del Rey, CA and, on my day off, drove to Burbank and took the Warner Brothers VIP Tour.  I wore my ‘Luke’s Diner’ t-shirt, which I still have today.  Needless to say, I’m rather a big fan of Gilmore Girls.  Unlike many of the other fandoms to which I belong, however, there’s something a trifle mysterious and – dare I say – even out of place with this show.  Most of my other escapes are to faraway worlds with the flair of the fantastical; Hogwarts, Gotham City, Pern, Middle Earth, Dragaera, Gallifrey, and so on.  These universes, and the stories that take place within them, have all been well traversed, speaking to me on many different levels.  From adolescence and early adulthood, they have proved to be the tools that would shed light on my innermost identity, shape who I am as a writer/filmmaker/creative and continue to help me understand and trust myself during my darkest hours.   Gilmore Girls was no less instrumental in this process, but I still find myself at a bit of loss to explain why.  To start with, fantasy worlds provide built-in escapism, but Gilmore Girls is a real-world sentimental drama series.  Harry Potter (along with several of the others) place heavy emphasis on what it means to be powerful; Hogwarts has been the place where I go to remember my inner strength and find adventure.

So what drew me – and kept me attached – to Gilmore Girls? 

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Why I Like: Cons

Cosplaying at Awesome Con DC 2015

AC 2015 Who Panel

R-L: Myself (10th Doctor), DL Moody, Justin Moe (11th Doctor), Nathan Moe.

One of the highlights of 2015 for me was, for the second time, happily attending Awesome Con in the nation’s capital.  For my part, it was a tremendous improvement over 2014; still was not quite up to Baltimore Comic Con’s level, but it’s done a mighty job getting closer.

I’m still something of a cosplay rookie; I’m still learning to sew and almost every ensemble I’ve worn has been compiled from pre-made articles of clothing, either purchased from a store, Goodwill, or unearthed from the depths of my own closet.  That said, I have only ever attended Cons in costume, which came as a bit of surprise when I realized it.  I’d been interested in seeing what conventions were like for quite awhile—I’d just never actually made it to one until 2013, when a close friend of mine said: “This September.  Baltimore Comic Con.  We’re going.”

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Of Elves, Gamers, and Paintball.

“There’s a little bit of ‘geek’ and ‘hero’ in all of us.”

Even if I hadn’t heard about Rise of the Fellowship through the grapevine of friends and current and future colleagues, its likely that this film still would have crossed my path.  I am a Lord of the Rings fan—both Tolkien’s literary masterwork and Peter Jackson’s cinematic adaptation (which I rambled on about just a few posts ago)—as well as a fan of fantasy and sci-fi in general and an independent filmmaker myself.  However, I’m not generally a fan of parodies or spoof-style movies so I had some initial concern that Fellow’s Hip—as it was called then—was going to be something more along those lines; a perfectly pleasant romp that, while clever in its delivery, still just retold the same story with a different setting and vernacular.

I was delighted to find, though, that this was not the case at all. The film is distinct and entirely its own, which, truly, is its biggest strength.

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