This Was 2018

MAG Fest.
Releasing my book – 
my book – into the wild and selling more copies than I could have imagined.
A massive haircut; from waist-length locks to an asymmetrical long bob.

Joining a writing group; which has become a highlight of each month.
Coffee journeys and road trips.  Book releases and signings; conventions without cosplay.

Examination of prophecy, the Arthurian myth, and developing a new novel.
Film sets; sawing a witch in half and suspending a heroine on the side of a cliff.
Company growth; a new video production office.
Making new friends and finally meeting old ones face to face. 

The Ode to Joy.  Steve Harrington and Luna Lovegood.

Robots in San Francisco.  Excalibur casino –– stranded –– in Las Vegas.  Surreal.

Black Panther, your name., A Wrinkle In Time, Infinity War, Ocean’s 8, Ant-Man and the Wasp, Christopher Robin, Into the Spider-Verse, Mary Poppins Returns.

NaNoWriMo…however short lived.  New characters, new stories, new world building.
Watching friends return to themselves; rekindle their old spark and starting creating again.

Journeys and realizations and changes.
Making spiritual choices and finding a home at Collective.
A self-publishing rollercoaster.

Exhaustion and political anxiety.
Walking out on new branches.

A Wrinkle in Time, Sourdough, The Crystal Cave and The Hollow Hills, The Night Circus, American Street, Fawkes, Uprooted, The Wicked Deep, Stardust, The Queen’s Thief, and Labyrinth Lost.

This was 2018.

NaNoWriMo

I can’t remember when I decided that this year, 2018, I would finally tackle NaNoWriMo.  For most of the year, I have been developing, outlining, and crafting a new story, a new novel, and I was certain it was in perfect shape for the National Novel Writing Month challenge.  It’s an idea, a premise, and a cast of characters that have been circulating in my creative mind for over ten years – at least high school – and I had completed the outline  (for the most part) by August, leaving me to basically just finesse a few plot points, transitions, etc., and then sit down to write the prose proper, come November 1st. 

Except that a new idea, a variation for this story, hit me at the end of October, and if I incorporated it, effectively 80% of my outline would be rendered null and void.

Fighting back panic, I tried to ignore the new development and heed NaNo advice from authors both in person and online (“don’t think, just write!”) and so, when November arrived, I rolled up my sleeves, placed fingers over the keyboard…and knew within four days that I wouldn’t make it.

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Full Circle

What an amazing start to the day!  My friend and awesome teacher, Sara Jacobs, brought my attention to an Instagram post (by @archers_all_stars); three photos with a group of students viewing my first film, an adaptation/fan film of Chris Van Allsburg’s The Stranger.

Original post: “Every year when the weather starts to get cold, I read aloud The Stranger by Chris Van Allsburg!! Then, I let them watch a short 18 minute video based on the book!! Talk about 30 minutes of pure engagement and discussion!!! Love it!!! ❤️❤️…”

Moments like this make my heart sing. The book remains magical to me; it sparked my draw to storytelling and crafting narrative, which led me to filmmaking, writing a novel, and working in media production. So it’s wonderful to see the story continue to reach new students, and I couldn’t be happier to be a small part of that through the film.

Shout out to the rest of the “Stranger” team: Jenna MillerJustin MoeDevin Connor, Rob Engels, Katy Cox Engels, Brendan Biondi, Elizabeth Anne Taylor, Lorrin Rodgers, and Shane Hann.

Watch the film below:

Out of Books! A Recount of Baltimore Comic Con 2018

While I wasn’t able to manage cosplaying at Baltimore Comic Con this year, I did sell every remaining copy of my novel. For the first time, I have to order more copies from the printer because I have completely run out! The exciting thing is, I have one (possibly two) more scheduled book events for 2018.

Baltimore Comic Con holds an especially significant place in my heart; it was my first convention. It was the first place that I cosplayed as Sethera, a lead character from Genre Wars – as in, I wore the costume we’d used for filming the web series, but beyond the set, beyond the safe, close-confined walls of our own universe. I’m not much of a comic book reader, but I have an affinity for the space comic book conventions allow, and even more now for the opportunity for me to share my work with attendees in a whole new way.

I was beyond nervous for this event. For MAGFest (the biggest convention at which I’d participated until Comic Con), I was surrounded by friends who were an unbelievable help in finding and setting up my table, giving me chances to get food, and – most important – calming my nerves. This time, though, I was on my own. Thankfully, I got amazingly lucky with great neighbors and we looked out for one another’s tables when we stepped away.

I rearranged my display and actually got both posters on the table – a first!

What does this mean? Well, after reviewing my sales and orders through the publisher, I’ve calculated that 115-120 copies of Resistance Rising are out in the world. This includes the copies purchased through the crowdfunding on Indiegogo, the paperbacks living on local library shelves, and those I have sold since at various events, including MAGFest 2018, the Rukundo Wine Tasting fundraising event, local coffee shop signings, the Maryland Renaissance Festival, the Greencastle Fall Seasonal Marketplace and, finally, Baltimore Comic Con.

So…what’s next? For the immediate future, I’m going to catch up on my rest. Again, my disappointment was not being able to cosplay (just too much to take on while also selling the book), but with October finally arrived, I can now shift focus to rocking multiple Halloween costumes.

New Beginnings

I may have fallen off the CampNaNoWriMo wagon in July, but I did manage to finish the month with a new prologue.  It may be short, but it sets the tone for one of the projects I will be working on in the near future.  And that makes me happy.  
Below is a snippet from the prologue to ‘Sophia,’ inspired by the Star Wipe Films short film, inspired, in turn, by the myth of Hades and Persephone. 
 
Sophia - prologue excerpt

@robincfarrell on Instagram

The TIVA-DC Peer Awards

Every year, the Television, Internet, & Video Association of DC holds their Peer Awards Ceremony.  I’ve personally been attending since 2015 as part of DUO Media Productions.  We’ll be back again this year – already looking forward to it! – but we were asked what makes it special.  Why we submit our work?  Why do we make a special point to dress up and go to the annual evening event?

In this video, some of DUO’s team members – myself included – expound on our enthusiasm, and what makes being a media maker in the Washington, DC / Maryland / Virginia region.

Fingers crossed DUO takes home some 2018 Golds!

 

The Incredibles

I emerged from the theatre cheering after seeing The Incredibles for the first time.   I loved it.  It was the most openly fun I’d had during a Pixar film thus far and it remains one of my personal favorites.  It’s always a joy to watch and when I think of Pixar, this is one of the first ones that springs to the forefront of my mind.

However, with this rewatch, I found it surprisingly difficult to articulate why I enjoy it so much.  What is it, exactly, that makes The Incredibles so . . .  well . . . incredible?

From the jump, story and tone strike just the right balance between quiet, wild, imaginative, witty, sweet, and speculative. I could break down elaborate, nitty-gritty examples of why this movie is so effective (Michael Giacchino‘s score, the style and art direction, homage v. originality, etc.) but, truthfully?  This film demonstrates an unusually solid example of “movie magic”; when the whole is greater than the sum of its parts (for me, at least).   A lot of that comes down to the team behind it; if Pete Docter is my favorite Pixar director, then Brad Bird comes in at a very close second.  I’ve been a fan of his style since I first saw The Iron Giant (oh, how I love that film, too).  In Bird’s films, I most appreciate the dialogue, pace, and – like with Docter – the ambition.  There are blurred moral lines here.  We may not sympathize with the villains, but we understand them.  While their decisions and reactions to their circumstances may be wrong, the points they make are very often sound. 

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The Night Circus

The Night CircusI’ve been on something on a book hiatus for the past couple of years.  Writing my own novel and trying to finish it probably had a lot to do with that.  However, my lack of reading started to worry me; at first, I felt guilty, then I started to miss it.  Last year, I picked up A Wrinkle In Time for the first time (in preparation for seeing the film), followed quickly by Neverwhere (my first Gaiman novel) since there was a staged production coming up near me.  I rounded out this set of books with Robin Sloan’s Sourdough, and each of these books were fantastic, in their own, unique way.  All three deserve their own book reviews (coming soon, I hope) and all three were delicious reading experiences.  They suited me perfectly and, with their powers combined, they sucked me back into the world of reading.  I found myself seeking a new book that would ring similar tones to Neverwhere, thus I landed on The Night Circus.  It’s been on my TBR list for years.  I can remember seeing it on a shelf in a local indie bookstore in Vermont back in the summer of 2012, thinking,  I really should get a move on with this.

Immediately after starting this book, I said to myself, “I can see what all the hype was about.”  There had been a reputation surrounding this book since publication, or so it seemed.  It had given me pause (much in the way Harry Potter had done), and considering the inside cover sells the idea that this book rides on a romance, I wasn’t sure what to expect.  Even when I carried this book out of the library, a girl passed me, doubled back, and told me how wonderful it was.  From the first few pages, I could feel the strength of the story, and the control Morgenstern has with her words,  with her craft.  Even more delightfully, that sense of wonder and immersion continued through to the end of the book.  I kept worrying that it would fall apart, that the book would run out of steam and turn out to be a dud, but it follows through.

Also, the audiobook is brilliant, spectacularly narrated by Jim Dale.

Verdict: I enjoyed reading this story tremendously and I can’t wait to see what Erin Morgenstern comes up with next.

Finding Nemo

Confession: I’ve never been a huge fan of Finding Nemo

And I’ve always felt a little guilty about that.  This marked the first occasion where I left a Pixar screening with a lukewarm feeling, rather than being WOW!-ed.

Don’t get me wrong: I do like this movie.  In fact, I have liked every Pixar feature film I’ve ever seen in some capacity (though I avoided The Good Dinosaur and all of the Cars sequels and spinoffs). I’m just not moved by Finding Nemo. I don’t relate to it personally.  Given the choice, I would pick several others from Pixar’s collection to watch first.

Viewing it again for this series, I went in with the sincere hope that it would resonate with me differently as an adult, as it happened with A Bug’s Life and Monsters, Inc. (both of which I already loved, have watched repeatedly over the years, and I often think about).  However, Nemo struck me about the same as before. I can now articulate more clearly the aspects of it that I enjoy and I realize that there are more things I like, while also identifying the specifics of why this movie has never struck a chord with me.

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